Self-care and remote-working

Self-care and remote-working

Here are some self-care tips for remote-working. They should really be posted on my other site Developmental Conversations but I can’t get the blog to publish properly, so here they are.

Most of these ideas will apply generally to working from home whether or not this involves meeting with others via video link. Some apply particularly to video-linking.

I am not great at this myself. If you were to tell me to practice what I preach you would be half right. Not all suggestions will apply or be useful to everyone, though. Have a look and see what you think.

These ideas are partly drawn from experience and conversation but also through consulting multiple sources. Key sources are listed at the bottom.

Curating the context:

General wellbeing:

  • Eat, Exercise, Sleep
  • Protect boundaries (see below)
  • Practice self-compassion
  • Build morale (see below)

Transition

Pay attention to the transition from normal into remote working. This advice may seem a bit too late. A major problem with the Coronavirus pandemic is that it bumped huge numbers into remote working without any preparation or training, and without much in the way of choice. Nevertheless, there is still a lot you can do:

  • Acknowledge it as a major transition. Go easy on yourself. Don’t give yourself a hard time if you get some things wrong or are slow to pick up speed.
  • Don’t assume that you can work at the same pace as you did before. Communication by video link requires more effort. We have become communication novices overnight and there are lots of techniques still to learn.
  • Schedule a lighter diary to start with – that is, one that looks lighter. You may well find that you are more tired after it than you expect.
  • Learn and plan more explicitly than you normally do. So much of face-to-face communication and time management we learned by implicit means and over years, so now we need to read up and network to gather tips and strategies. Write them down. Adapt them to suit your work and temperament and build them into your practice.

Space

  • Dedicated space

If possible establish a space devoted entirely to work, remote linking or otherwise. If you do not have the luxury of space that can be devoted only to this, then have a place that you can reliably use – and you do use – for the remote linking, so that camera angles, background etc are already settled. Some people walk.

  • Good lighting

This is important for your comfort (eye strain), productivity (energy and focus) and, when it comes to video calling it is important that your face is clearly, but not harshly, illuminated for the person you are meeting.

  • Noise control
    • ambient noise needs to be minimised for you to be clearly audible, and for you and others to be undistracted.
    • volume control covered also below. This will be affected by equipment, distance from the microphone etc.
    • com suggest a white noise machine to shut out distracting sounds. I have no idea if this works and I am not going to try it, but it is a thought. I doubt if this is for the video call, though.
  • Comfortable seating
  • Plenty of surface area. You need to be able to take notes without rustling, reach for references without leaving the frame etc.
  • Personal joyful stuff. Traject recommend this, and I am not sure. The comfort and uplift that this provides needs to be weighed against distraction and boundary diffusion.

Time

  • Protect your time.
  • Set a daily schedule:
    • Make sure you know what is work time and when you are off work.
    • Make sure you know what project you are engaged in at any one time.
  • Include casual connections with colleagues (as you would do in the workplace), not just formal meetings.
  • Schedule fresh air and exercise.

Communication

Broadly speaking, channels of communication and communication skill have both been reduced drastically, all round, so more effort will be needed:

  • Be positive and supportive.
  • Overcommunicate rather than undercommunicate.
  • Clarify:
    • how others can reach you
    • when others can catch you
    • expectations
    • and clear up issues quickly with a phone call.
  • Interpret problems as miscommunication rather than malice.
  • Ask for feedback
  • Reply promptly
  • Establish how to share documents

The Work

Your working style

  • Identify your “productivity weaknesses” and address them:
    • Procrastination
    • Distraction
    • Fatigue
    • Boredom
  • Maintain your brand or culture and, if in a team, the team culture.
  • Maintain morale:
    • Dress and groom
    • Chart project progress

The meeting

  • Not everything requires a meeting.
  • On the other hand, the human face humanises.
  • Ground yourself before you start.
  • Volume
    • Can you be heard?
    • Can you hear without strain?
    • Consider confidentiality – being overheard
    • Earphones?
  • Decide on Chair, facilitator, use of mute, hand signals, and chat.
  • Decide on speaker view or (eg for chair) gallery view.
  • Decide on chat before, after, or not at all.
  • Establish alternative routes of communication
    • For documents
    • In event of interruption
    • Chat function
  • Ask for feedback
    • Can you be heard?
    • Were you understood?
    • Did you understand?
  • Avoid multitasking
  • Avoid rudeness in the room (like looking at your phone)

Here are some sites to which I am indebted for ideas:

A good description of the need: https://twitter.com/LeapersCo/status/1257941168182243328?s=20

Traject:                                                                                                          https://bytraject.com/blog/tips-for-working-remotely/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_content=&utm_campaign=&utm_term= https://twitter.com/ByTraject/status/1244814375485083648?s=20

Inc.com                                                                                                           https://www.inc.com/lindsey-pollak-eileen-coombes/remote-work-home-productivity-communication-self-care-morale-team.html?utm_content=122166550&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&hss_channel=tw-893547756282822656

MyCareAcademy https://twitter.com/MyCareAcademy/status/1242015839433474048/photo/2

Realbusiness.co.uk                                                                         https://realbusiness.co.uk/mental-health-covid-19/

@Leapers (eg on video calls, Matthew Knight) https://www.leapers.co/articles/2020-04-17/i-think-youre-on-mute-seven-ways-of-making-video-calls-less-stressful

And back to Home Page: Therapeutic Attitude

Staff Wellbeing in Crisis

Staff Wellbeing in Crisis

Protecting Staff Mental Health Through Covid-19

There are still plenty of things that individuals, teams, and services can do to minimise the traumatic impact on individual staff in the impending pandemic “peak”.

The following are action points extrapolated from two key review papers. Links to those papers are provided below. Emphasis is on current staff mental and emotional well-being and reducing the risk of future sequelae of trauma.

All members have a role in the health of the team, but some individuals, on behalf of the organisation, hold explicit responsibility for the health and efficacy of teams. To highlight this I have created separate lists for individuals and those with specific leadership responsibilities.

Individuals:

  • Competence and efficacy. Feeling competent and prepared helps to protect you from negative outcomes. Practice procedures. Satisfy yourself that you are ready. If there is an area you feel less confident of, seek support and develop a plan.
  • Motivation. Motivation is protective. Remind yourself how important your work is.
  • Fitness improves your resistance to emotional strain. Use proactive, strategies to stay mentally and physically well. Don’t deny. Use action to distract. Exercise, relax, fix something, meditate – whatever is familiar and suits you. Make relaxation a skill. Use planned problem-solving. Hold back on alcohol. Avoid drugs.
  • Being integral to a team is protective. Plan together. Rehearse the plan for the day. Practice skills. Share successes as well as fears and other reactions. Do not stigmatise feelings, either in yourself or others.
  • Secure your secure base. Satisfy yourself you have done what you can to protect yourself and your family. Practical steps; insurance, wills.
  • Social connection is protective. Connect with friends and family. Don’t expect them to understand what work is like, exactly. Spend quality time with them, even briefly. They will want to help you but may not know how. Make clear requests.
  • It helps to feel effective. If you need quarantine, use this time away from maximum exposure to recharge your emotional batteries. If it frustrates you to be prevented from work, find something you can do to support the team – revise protocols etc.

Leadership

  • The wellbeing of team members depends on being and feeling Safe, Skilled, Connected, and Prepared. Make every effort to ensure all team members have the skills and the equipment to do their work safely and well.
  • Team spirit and morale protect. Make yourself accessible to team members. Encourage supportive relationships within teams.
  • Preparation protects. Train team members, and rehears roles, skills, and communication. Establish key phrases for difficult moral decisions, such as “your own oxygen mask first.”
  • Belonging, and team morale are protective. Meet and share. Normalise (do not mandate) grief, doubt, frustration, fear. Celebrate positives, like cohesion, team spirit, tenacity. Identify learning if it can be operationalised. Divert from stigma and blame, including self-blame. Include all, including reception and support staff.
  • Communication is key. Establish regular times for sharing information and updates.
  • Appreciated voluntary contribution protects. Take seriously, and find a way to act on, any suggestions from individuals. As much as possible enable individuals to feel in control of their work.
  • Vulnerability to trauma varies between individuals and between roles. Know your team members and be aware of early signs – fatigue, poor sleep, health worries, avoidance, increased alcohol use. Act early to support.
  • Sharing protects. Try to avoid individuals having sole responsibility for areas or individual patients.
  • Traumatic harm is cumulative Consider rotating a team member through roles to reduce overall exposure.
  • Competent contributing protects. If rotating team members into less exposed situations ensure they understand they are recharging their batteries, and still have a skilled contribution to make. Train them in that skill if they are not confident.
  • Individuals differ in what they need from down time and support. Have a flexible approach to support and down time and agree this with individuals. Establish a stepped approach to support in the organisation. Support the supporters.

Source material can be found on the website for the Association of Anaesthetists. These are review papers summarising findings from research carried out during and following the SARS pandemic:

A Systematic, Thematic Review of Social and Occupational Factors Associated With Psychological Outcomes in Healthcare Employees During an Infectious Disease Outbreak (PDF) Brooks et al JOEM Volume 60, Number 3, March 2018,

Traumatic stress within disaster-exposed occupations: overview of the literature and suggestions for the management of traumatic stress in the workplace (PDF) Brooks Rubin and Greenberg 2018 British Medical Bulletin, 2018, 1–10 doi: 10.1093/bmb/ldy04

Andrew West April 2020 2/2

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