Reaching Across and Introducing Animus

Reaching Across and Introducing Animus

The last nine Covid months have been weird. They have felt relatively unproductive, and yet I think something intangible or indefinite has happened. I think a great deal has been processing in the background. In the foreground, so to speak, one of the things I did was to write a piece for the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy in which I try, rather ambitiously, to set out what remote working has taught me about therapeutic process – or “being with”.

I attach a link to the pdf below and invite you to read it whilst respecting copyright. Here, though, are two essential points:

  1. I talk about content and process and assert that video conferencing platforms favour content at the expense of process. I give examples of how timing is messed with and non verbal material is sacrificed so that verbal content can be transmitted as intact as possible. But I acknowledge that the distinction between the two is not absolute or clear. “Which is the content and which the process, for example, when a mother and a baby look at one another?” The therapist looks for the content in the process. I believe this is one important reason for the increased effort needed to carry out certain categories of conversation when the participants are “remote”: How to be with someone when you can’t actually be with them.
  2. I invite the reader to an exploratory use of the idea of animus. I use this word, not in the gendered sense that Jung used it, nor in the sense of aggressive urge, but to denote that which gives life to or animates our utterance. If what I have to say to you is to reach you, and if you are to appreciate it in a holistic sense – ie not simply the overt content but also the content embedded in process – then it must reach you with its animus intact. Human contact is a living process. This, I believe, is something that the video conferencing platform with its binary coding, simplistic algorithms, and bias in favour of verbal content, cannot yet achieve.
The article provided here in pdf form appears in the October 2020 issue of Thresholds, published by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy. www.bacp.co.uk/bacp-journals/thresholds/ BACP 2020©.

Self-care and remote-working

Self-care and remote-working

Here are some self-care tips for remote-working. They should really be posted on my other site Developmental Conversations but I can’t get the blog to publish properly, so here they are.

Most of these ideas will apply generally to working from home whether or not this involves meeting with others via video link. Some apply particularly to video-linking.

I am not great at this myself. If you were to tell me to practice what I preach you would be half right. Not all suggestions will apply or be useful to everyone, though. Have a look and see what you think.

These ideas are partly drawn from experience and conversation but also through consulting multiple sources. Key sources are listed at the bottom.

Curating the context:

General wellbeing:

  • Eat, Exercise, Sleep
  • Protect boundaries (see below)
  • Practice self-compassion
  • Build morale (see below)

Transition

Pay attention to the transition from normal into remote working. This advice may seem a bit too late. A major problem with the Coronavirus pandemic is that it bumped huge numbers into remote working without any preparation or training, and without much in the way of choice. Nevertheless, there is still a lot you can do:

  • Acknowledge it as a major transition. Go easy on yourself. Don’t give yourself a hard time if you get some things wrong or are slow to pick up speed.
  • Don’t assume that you can work at the same pace as you did before. Communication by video link requires more effort. We have become communication novices overnight and there are lots of techniques still to learn.
  • Schedule a lighter diary to start with – that is, one that looks lighter. You may well find that you are more tired after it than you expect.
  • Learn and plan more explicitly than you normally do. So much of face-to-face communication and time management we learned by implicit means and over years, so now we need to read up and network to gather tips and strategies. Write them down. Adapt them to suit your work and temperament and build them into your practice.

Space

  • Dedicated space

If possible establish a space devoted entirely to work, remote linking or otherwise. If you do not have the luxury of space that can be devoted only to this, then have a place that you can reliably use – and you do use – for the remote linking, so that camera angles, background etc are already settled. Some people walk.

  • Good lighting

This is important for your comfort (eye strain), productivity (energy and focus) and, when it comes to video calling it is important that your face is clearly, but not harshly, illuminated for the person you are meeting.

  • Noise control
    • ambient noise needs to be minimised for you to be clearly audible, and for you and others to be undistracted.
    • volume control covered also below. This will be affected by equipment, distance from the microphone etc.
    • com suggest a white noise machine to shut out distracting sounds. I have no idea if this works and I am not going to try it, but it is a thought. I doubt if this is for the video call, though.
  • Comfortable seating
  • Plenty of surface area. You need to be able to take notes without rustling, reach for references without leaving the frame etc.
  • Personal joyful stuff. Traject recommend this, and I am not sure. The comfort and uplift that this provides needs to be weighed against distraction and boundary diffusion.

Time

  • Protect your time.
  • Set a daily schedule:
    • Make sure you know what is work time and when you are off work.
    • Make sure you know what project you are engaged in at any one time.
  • Include casual connections with colleagues (as you would do in the workplace), not just formal meetings.
  • Schedule fresh air and exercise.

Communication

Broadly speaking, channels of communication and communication skill have both been reduced drastically, all round, so more effort will be needed:

  • Be positive and supportive.
  • Overcommunicate rather than undercommunicate.
  • Clarify:
    • how others can reach you
    • when others can catch you
    • expectations
    • and clear up issues quickly with a phone call.
  • Interpret problems as miscommunication rather than malice.
  • Ask for feedback
  • Reply promptly
  • Establish how to share documents

The Work

Your working style

  • Identify your “productivity weaknesses” and address them:
    • Procrastination
    • Distraction
    • Fatigue
    • Boredom
  • Maintain your brand or culture and, if in a team, the team culture.
  • Maintain morale:
    • Dress and groom
    • Chart project progress

The meeting

  • Not everything requires a meeting.
  • On the other hand, the human face humanises.
  • Ground yourself before you start.
  • Volume
    • Can you be heard?
    • Can you hear without strain?
    • Consider confidentiality – being overheard
    • Earphones?
  • Decide on Chair, facilitator, use of mute, hand signals, and chat.
  • Decide on speaker view or (eg for chair) gallery view.
  • Decide on chat before, after, or not at all.
  • Establish alternative routes of communication
    • For documents
    • In event of interruption
    • Chat function
  • Ask for feedback
    • Can you be heard?
    • Were you understood?
    • Did you understand?
  • Avoid multitasking
  • Avoid rudeness in the room (like looking at your phone)

Here are some sites to which I am indebted for ideas:

A good description of the need: https://twitter.com/LeapersCo/status/1257941168182243328?s=20

Traject:                                                                                                          https://bytraject.com/blog/tips-for-working-remotely/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_content=&utm_campaign=&utm_term= https://twitter.com/ByTraject/status/1244814375485083648?s=20

Inc.com                                                                                                           https://www.inc.com/lindsey-pollak-eileen-coombes/remote-work-home-productivity-communication-self-care-morale-team.html?utm_content=122166550&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&hss_channel=tw-893547756282822656

MyCareAcademy https://twitter.com/MyCareAcademy/status/1242015839433474048/photo/2

Realbusiness.co.uk                                                                         https://realbusiness.co.uk/mental-health-covid-19/

@Leapers (eg on video calls, Matthew Knight) https://www.leapers.co/articles/2020-04-17/i-think-youre-on-mute-seven-ways-of-making-video-calls-less-stressful

And back to Home Page: Therapeutic Attitude